Fear This Insect Pennsylvania!

A new threat to Pennsylvania is the SPOTTED LANTERNFLY (Lycorma delicatula) which is a one-inch-long, red, black and white planthopper that’s native to Southeast Asia and was first identified in Berks County, PA in 2014.

What’s at stake with Spotted Lanternfly (SLF)?

Your Maple trees and “Pennsylvania’s $132.5 billion agriculture industry and the quality of life for more than 13 million Pennsylvanians.”

What does this planthopper like to eat?

SLF feeds on the sap from a number of plants but prefers grapevines, maples, black walnut, birch and willow. Its feeding damage stresses plants and in some cases causes death. Photo of SLF feeding: Emelie Swackhamer

YOUR MISSION: Search for egg masses and scrape them off

Egg masses are a light gray wax-like substance that take on the appearance of mud and encompass an average of 30-50 individual eggs. Photo: Erica Smyers

“We need every Pennsylvanian to hunt for egg masses this fall and winter and destroy them – or we’re in for a scary spring.”

PA Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding
More on how to stop the spread of SLF

From the PA Department of Agriculture:

  • Learn how residents and businesses can comply with the SLF Quarantine Order.
  • Any efforts you make in destroying the Spotted Lanternfly or its’ egg masses help reduce populations on your property and in your community.
    • SLF can be controlled by a combination of:
  • If you are in a quarantine area, please “Look Before You Leave” as SLF can move easily.
  • Use the SLF checklist to complete inspections of vehicles, trailers, or any outdoor items before movement within or out of quarantine locations.
  • Report SLF sightings:
How far has it spread?

This October 19, 2021 map shows it’s already been reported in Beaver, Allegheny and Westmoreland counties in western Pennsylvania, as well as in Jefferson county in eastern Ohio:

This insect is reminiscent of the widespread path of destruction caused by the Emerald Ash Borer. Not good!

Bob

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: