MARCELLUS SHALE HISTORY: Trucking & FracNet 2010

When the first Marcellus shale gas boom started in earnest in Pennsylvania, a large percentage of oil and gas industry trucks had major safety issues. This was graphically revealed during an operation by the Pennsylvania State Police known as ‘Operation FracNet.’

Pa. State Police cracks down on trucks hauling wastewater from Marcellus gas drilling sites

October 6, 2010 | AP

 HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) – A Pennsylvania State Police crackdown last week on commercial vehicles hauling wastewater from Marcellus Shale gas drilling sites resulted in hundreds of citations and 208 trucks taken off the road.

Police on Wednesday announced the result of a three-day enforcement effort that was focused on Bradford, Clearfield, Susquehanna, Tioga and Washington counties.

Troopers issued 959 citations, most commonly for violations related to brakes, lights or permits. Sixty-four drivers were placed out of service. Police conducted 1,135 inspections.

About two-thirds of the vehicles taken off the road were hauling wastewater from wells, and some of the others were also related to the horizontal fracturing drilling technique known as “fracking.”

About two-thirds of the vehicles taken off the road were hauling wastewater from wells, and some of the others were also related to the horizontal fracturing drilling technique known as “fracking.”

AP | October 6, 2010

During a previous “Operation FracNET” effort in June, 250 trucks and 45 drivers were idled, and 669 citations were issued.

Marcellus Shale natural gas drilling requires massive amounts of water. Some of it returns to the surface and must be hauled away.

State police crack down on gas drilling trucks

October 6, 2010 | Observer-Reporter

State police placed 208 trucks out of service during a three-day enforcement effort that focused on commercial vehicles hauling waste water from Marcellus Shale natural gas drilling operations in the state, Commissioner Frank E. Pawlowski announced today.

“Pennsylvania is experiencing heavy truck traffic in areas where Marcellus Shale natural gas drilling operations are taking place, particularly in Bradford, Clearfield, Susquehanna, Tioga and Washington counties,” Pawlowski said. “The process of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, requires significant amounts of water to be delivered to the sites and later trucked away.”

Pawlowski said 140 of the vehicles placed out of service were trucks hauling waste water from the drilling operations.

In total, 1,135 trucks were inspected during “Operation FracNET,” which was conducted Sept. 27-29. In addition to placing vehicles out of service, state police also issued 959 citations and placed 64 drivers out of service. The most common problems involved faulty brakes, exterior lighting issues and hauling permit violations.

In Troop B , which takes in Allegheny, Fayette, Greene and Washington counties, there were 343 inspections, 60 vehicles placed out of service and 168 citations.

Observer-Reporter | October 6, 2010

In Troop B , which takes in Allegheny, Fayette, Greene and Washington counties, there were 343 inspections, 60 vehicles placed out of service and 168 citations.

MARCELLUS SHALE HISTORY:
MORE NEWS:

Investigation reveals oil and gas drilling waste dumped at local magistrate, Dairy Queen
March 29, 2017 – An investigation conducted by the Office of the Attorney General revealed oil and gas industry waste was illegally dumped at multiple Fayette County locations, including Dairy Queen property in Uniontown and a magistrate’s office. The illegal dumping allegedly occurred at five locations, including an area behind Dairy Queen at 575 West Main St. in Uniontown and Magisterial District Judge Richard Kasunic II’s office at 3177 Pittsburgh St. in Star Junction. The waste originated at Trans Energy sites in West Virginia. Test results completed at each location detected diesel fuel and compounds including barium, sulfate and strontium, indicative of shale formation cuttings, investigators said. Employees allegedly began the illegal dumping at Joseph’s property, called the “Perry Pit” off of Zias Road on Joseph’s direction. He allegedly admitted that he began directing drivers to dump 1,000 tri-axle truckloads of waste, or about 22,000 tons, beginning in mid-2013.

PUC Rejects Proposed Settlement with Columbia Gas Concerning Washington County House Explosion
December 8, 2022 – HARRISBURG – The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (PUC) today rejected a proposed settlement regarding a natural gas explosion that destroyed a house in the City of Washington, Pennsylvania, in July 2019 – injuring several people and damaging other nearby homes.  The incident occurred as construction work was underway nearby on a Columbia Gas of Pennsylvania (Columbia Gas) project involving gas mains in the area. The Commission voted 3-2 to refer the matter to the PUC’s independent Bureau of Investigation and Enforcement (I&E) for further proceedings, based on a motion from PUC Chairman Gladys Brown Dutrieuille.

PUC Approves Settlement for Substantially Smaller Increase in Rates for Columbia Gas of Pennsylvania
December 8, 2022 – HARRISBURG – The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (PUC) today approved a partial settlement and recommendations from PUC administrative law judges for a substantially smaller than requested base rate increase for Columbia Gas of Pennsylvania – trimming the Columbia Gas increase by nearly 50%. Per the rates addressed in both settlements, the total average monthly bill of a residential customer using 70 therms of gas per month will increase from $123.24 to $128.96 (4.6%), compared to the original request from Columbia Gas, which would have raised that same total monthly residential bill from $123.24 to $135.67 (10.09%). 

PUC Seeks Comment on Proposed Settlement with Duquesne Light Regarding Alleged Inadvertent Release of Customer Information
Interested parties may submit comments, preferably via the Commission’s electronic filing system, within 25 days of publication of this Opinion and Order in the Pennsylvania Bulletin.  An eFile account may be opened free of charge and used through the Commission’s website. Paper comments may be filed with the PUC’s Secretary’s Bureau at the following address: Rosemary Chiavetta, Secretary, Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission, Commonwealth Keystone Building, 400 North Street, Harrisburg, PA  17120

The U.S. Shale Boom Is Officially Over
November 24, 2022 – The days of explosive growth in U.S. shale oil production are over. American oil production is rising, but at a much slower pace than it did before the 2020 crash, and at lower rates than expected a few months ago. Despite the expectation of a record output next year, the EIA has downgraded the numbers several times in 2022 so far. The latest cut is a massive 21% reduction in the growth estimate.

Photos of Pennsylvania fracking activities in 2010 and 2011

VIDEO: What would Rachel Carson say?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *