White Flowering Trees

Trees with white (or near white) flowers

Since there have been a large number of searches on BOBscaping.com for “white flowering trees” this web page lists many of the common white flowering trees growing in the northern regions of North America.


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CHIONANTHUS virginicus
White Fringetree

 

Small tree with lacy panicles of very fragrant white flowers in spring. Tolerates wet soil.

 


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CORNUS florida


Eastern Flowering Dogwood

White or pink spring flowers, appearing earlier than Kousa dogwood. Slow to moderate growth to 35 ft tall. Note: Some dogwoods labeled "red" in the nursery trade will actually appear to be "pink" when they bloom.


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CORNUS kousa


Chinese Dogwood

Creamy white blooms in June. Considered to be more reliable than Cornus florida. Slow to moderate growth to 35 ft.


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MAGNOLIA kobus stellate
 

Royal Star Magnolia

Fabulous white blossoms herald spring's arrival prior to leaf break. Deer resistant. Does best in full sun. Every yard should have a Star Magnolia. Moderate rate of growth to 20 ft across x 25 ft tall.



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MAGNOLIA virginiana
 

Sweetbay Magnolia

Super fragrant, creamy white flowers are a real treat in early summer. Just one more reason to grow Magnolias!  Moderate to fast growth to 25 ft.


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MALUS ‘Snowdrift’


Snowdrift Flowering Crabapple

Popular old variety of flowering crabapple growing 15-20' tall and wide. Covered with white flowers in spring followed by small, orange-red crabapples in fall that persist and are attractive to birds.


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PRUNUS x 'Snofozam'


Snow Fountains® Cherry

 

Cascading branches with white flowers in spring. The trunk of the tree in the top photo has been "twisted" to give it a zig-zag effect for added interest. One of Bob's favorites!


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PYRUS calleryana 'Bradford'


Bradford Pear

 

Fast growing pyramidal tree with white flowers in the spring followed by glossy green leaves. 45 ft tall with 25 ft spread. Bradford Pears form weak branch crotches and split-out in ice and wind storms, so Bob recommends planting a different cultivar of flowering pear.